Last edited by JoJogal
Tuesday, April 21, 2020 | History

2 edition of Sugar and society in the Caribbean found in the catalog.

Sugar and society in the Caribbean

Ramiro Guerra y SaМЃnchez

Sugar and society in the Caribbean

an economic history of Cuban agriculture.

by Ramiro Guerra y SaМЃnchez

  • 284 Want to read
  • 12 Currently reading

Published by Yale University Press in New Haven, Conn, London .
Written in English


Edition Notes

SeriesCaribbean series -- 7
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20351920M


Share this book
You might also like
Versions of poetic theatre in contemporary Canada.

Versions of poetic theatre in contemporary Canada.

The two gentlemen of Verona

The two gentlemen of Verona

Gmat

Gmat

Afghani and Abduh

Afghani and Abduh

Soundscapes: exploring music in a changing world. Instructors manual

Soundscapes: exploring music in a changing world. Instructors manual

From Luababa to Polk County

From Luababa to Polk County

third statue

third statue

Microbial culture

Microbial culture

Educational demands of to-day

Educational demands of to-day

painter, Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida

painter, Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida

Resource allocation and division of space

Resource allocation and division of space

The silent hour

The silent hour

Vancouver to Klondike and Canadian Yukon

Vancouver to Klondike and Canadian Yukon

Lords of the Earth

Lords of the Earth

Sugar and society in the Caribbean by Ramiro Guerra y SaМЃnchez Download PDF EPUB FB2

This interdisciplinary exploration of the effects and consequences of the cultivation of sugarcane and spread of the sugar industry in societies that relied on free, enslaved, and indentured labor compares the plantation systems used in the Caribbean and the southern United States with the small independent growers and cooperative units of India and the : Hardcover.

Book: Sugar and society in the Caribbean. An economic history of Cuban agriculture. + pp. see more details islands man and sugar were long ago drawn into patterned relationships, and that all of these relationships have developed along some parallel by: 9.

Sugar and Society in the Caribbean, An economic History of Cuban Agriculture by Ramiro Guerra y Sanchez by Ramiro Guerra y Sanchez and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at This book, by one of the leading scholars of sugar production and slavery in the Caribbean, is the most important work for understanding the place of sugar in modern world history.

This book traces the history of the South Porto Rico Sugar Company activities in Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic begging in There is a detailed bibliography as well as several appendices that include many statistics by municipality.

Prior to the 19th century, the plantation islands of the Caribbean were the most-valued possessions in the overseas Imperial world. Most valuable by far were the sugar plantations, which ranged from as little as eighty to as much as 2, or more acres of land, and from forty to or more slave labourers.

By the decade of the s, the sugar planters, especially those Author: Richard B. Sheridan. The sugar revolution took place in the years - This was due to the introduction in the British Caribbean colonies such as Barbados, Jamaica St Kiitts (St Christopher) etc. Social Stratification and Agency in a Sugar Plantation Society: Enslaved Africans, Free Blacks, and the White Planter Class in the Guiana Colonies and British Guiana,by Bernard Moitt and Horace L.

Henriques 6. Sugar and the Politics of Slavery in Mid-Nineteenth-Century Cuba, by Anton L. Allahar 7. This book covers the changing preference of growing sugar rather than tobacco which had been the leading crop in the trans-Atlantic colonies.

The Sugar Islands were Antigua, Barbados, St. Christopher Read full review. Edgar A. Toppin, "Ramiro Guerra y Sanchez and Sidney W.

Mintz, Sugar and Society in the Caribbean: An Economic History of Cuban Agriculture.," The Journal of Negro Hist no. 4 (October ): Sugar and slavery gave to the region a predominantly African population. This demographic revolution had important social consequences. Rather than being a relatively homogeneous ethnic group divided into categories based on economic criteria, Caribbean society had complex overlapping divisions of class and caste.

Foreword to Guerra y Sánchez, R., Sugar and Society in the Antilles, Yale Caribbean Series VII: xi-xliv. “Currency problems in eighteenth-century Jamaica and Gresham's Law,” in Manners, R., ed., Patterns and Processes in Culture: “Markets in Haiti,” New Society, March Search the world's most comprehensive index of full-text books.

My library. Sugar and society in the Caribbean. New Haven, Yale University Press, (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Ramiro Guerra. The history of every nation in the Caribbean, much of South America and parts of the Southern United States was forever shaped by sugar cane plantations started Author: Heather Whipps.

Sugar and society in the Caribbean: an economic history of Cuban agriculture. Combining fertile soils, vital trade routes, and a coveted strategic location, the islands and surrounding continental lowlands of the Caribbean were one of Europe’s earliest and most desirable colonial frontiers.

The region was colonized over the course of five centuries by a revolving cast of Spanish, Dutch, French, and English forces, who imported first African slaves. V.S. Naipaul may be a Caribbean author but his A Bend in the River is not set in the Caribbean, as it's set in Africa (the Congo).

It has been removed, as it doesn't match the description of this list ("For fiction and poetry about or set in the Caribbean"). Mintz, Sidney W., Foreword reprinted from Guerra y Sanchez, R., Sugar and Society in the Caribbean, Caribbean Series 7, Yale University Press, New Haven,pp.

xi-xiiv. First four sentences: In this book about men and sugar, Dr. Ramiro Guerra recounts a history. His story is laid in the Caribbean islands – islands which, for most of us, did not even exist a decade ago. Indian sugar then and now / B.S.

Baviskar --Cane and its uses in Grainger's The Sugar Cane, Selvon's "Cane is bitter," Moutoussamy's Aurore, and Julia's Les Gens de Bonne-Esperance / Dada Niang --Sugar, slavery, and marronnage in the French Caribbean / Bernard Moitt --Awakening, resistance, and empowerment / Joyce Leung --Social stratification.

Sidney Wilfred Mintz (Novem – Decem ) was an American anthropologist best known for his studies of the Caribbean, creolization, and the anthropology of received his PhD at Columbia University in and conducted his primary fieldwork among sugar-cane workers in Puerto Rico.

Later expanding his ethnographic research to Haiti and Alma mater: Brooklyn College (B.A.). Main Currents in Caribbean Thought probes deeply into the multicultural origins of Caribbean society, defining and tracing the evolution of the distinctive ideology that has arisen from the region?s unique historical mixture of peoples and beliefs.

Among the topics that noted scholar Gordon K. Lewis covers are the sixteenth- and seventeenth-century beginnings of Caribbean. Abstract. T he social structure of the slave societies in the Caribbean can best be understood by examining the complex interplay of race, colour, gender, occupation, caste and class.

This is in part because these soci- eties evolved in a similar pattern. Europeans largely destroyed the native Amerindian population, imported Africans as slave labourers, and developed the plantation Cited by: 2.

Andrea Stuart (born ) is a Barbadian-British historian and writer, who was raised in the Caribbean and the US and now lives in the UK. Her biography of Josephine Bonaparte, entitled The Rose of Martinique, won the Enid McLeod Literary Prize in Although her three published books so far have been non-fiction, she has spoken of working on a novel set in the Born: (age 56–57), Jamaica.

This chapter discusses the plantation economy of the West Indies colony, focusing on its sugar production, which dominated the Caribbean economy.

In all the West Indian colonies, sugar was the principal product, and was even the sole product of some. Plantations were significant in the West Indies colonies as they formed the basic social and economic units on the islands, Author: William A. Green. This study estimates the economic impact of hurricane strikes in the Caribbean from to More precisely, historical accounts of hurricane strikes and actual historical hurricane tracks, in conjunction with sugar export data taken from the colonial blue books and other historical sources, were used to create a cross-colony/country and time dataset that Cited by: 6.

Stuart, a London-based author of Barbadian ancestry, writes of contemporary England: “Sugar surrounds me here.” The majestic Harewood House in Leeds was built with money from Caribbean sugar. "The Caribbean: A History of the Region and Its Peoples" offers an authoritative one-volume survey of this complex and fascinating region.

This groundbreaking work traces the Caribbean from its pre-Columbian state through European contact and colonialism to the rise of US hegemony and the economic turbulence of the twenty-first century.

The Caribbean’s Cultural History Columbus’ discovery in set off a chain of events in the emergence of the Caribbean society, as Knight states in his book The Caribbean. "The first voyage of Columbus in fortuitously discovered a whole new world and set in motion a chain of events whose profound consequences gave new directions to.

Slavery in the Caribbean slavery Slavery has been found among many groups of low material culture, as in the Malay Peninsula and among some Native Americans; it also has occurred in more highly developed societies, such as the southern United States.